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-   -   Today I read: The book thread (http://www.dadstayshome.com/showthread.php?t=4483)

silviomossa 02-10-2007 05:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cjbart (Post 64821)
It takes a lot longer to read a whole book than it used to.

Geez, ain't that the truth! I've renewed Fiasco too many times at the library. Glad their whole system is online.

I also have the Gore book -- got it for Christmas. Still have not had the inclination to pick it up, several others interest me more.

I'm also reading a slew of baseball stat books to prep for the season: Shandler's "Baseball Forecaster", McKamey's "Minor League Baseball Analyst", handbookd from both James and BA. And the Baseball Prospectus comes out in three weeks. Real page turners! =P~

stretch 02-10-2007 05:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cjbart (Post 64821)
It takes a lot longer to read a whole book than it used to.

Also agreed. That's why I like short story anthologies by the bed for that 20-minute quick fix before you nod off and start drooling down onto the pages.

This is a pretty good series to suit almost any range of interests.

Usually also takes me a few months to get through Gardner Dozois's doorstep-sized Year's Best Science Fiction anthology. And it's always well-chosen.

Math Daddy 02-10-2007 08:36 PM

I'm working on the Crown of Stars series by Kate Elliott. On Book 2, Prince of Dogs, at the moment. I'm rather enjoying it. I recently devoured several series by Harry Turtledove, including Derlavai, Crosstime Traffic, and War Between the Provinces. All very good alternative history novels, if you're into that kind of thing.

Joey G 02-11-2007 03:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Louis (Post 64820)
had a hard time with that one. he developed the plot rather slowly. Still not a bad, albeit pedestrian, read though.

Currently going through Jeff Shaara's "To The Last Man" a historical/novel of characters in the first world war. Pershing, Patton, Haig, Petain, Foch, Joffre, Rickenbacker (94th Aero Squaderon), and Richthofen. Follows a nice chronology where you're initially introduced to a british reinforcement infantryman who's developed nicely in the first two chapters but gets mowed down suddenly (point being few groundtroops lasted more than a few months). Later Richthofen gets downed just before Pershing's AEF ramps up and Rickenbacker is just starting out in his flying career. With two of the lead characters now dead the story picks up with two characters in the AEF who are Marines having to switch to army uniforms as the marines colours resemble that of the Germans. Interesting to see how they develop.

Pershing, Joffre and Haig still remain the overall backbone of the story

I'm about 300 pages in to Bag of Bones, and admittedly, not a lot has happened. King has done this with some of his other books, where it takes a long time for the plot to build (Cujo comes to mind), but so far it hasn't been dull.

The Jeff Shaara book sounds interesting. I enjoyed his two American Revolution books.

JG

North Country Dad 02-11-2007 03:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cjbart (Post 64821)
It takes a lot longer to read a whole book than it used to.

Not if they're board books. :shock:

I'm interested in reading Fiasco, but time is so limited and my list of "books to read" is long. Would you guys mind posting a few short insights on it?

Oh, yeah, and I read Time cover to cover every week. Some of it is so-so, but it's a quick way to get the weekly news scoop.

Bollux 02-11-2007 03:49 AM

Star Wars: Betrayal

Jackson's Dad 02-11-2007 04:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by silviomossa (Post 64817)
Reading "Fiasco" by Thomas Ricks. About the war. Title says it all.

I started that book -- very well written, and so easy to read. But I had to stop after a chapter because it's so depressing. What a mess. I think the first thing that hits you, is that this war has been in the making for a long time. The key players (Cheney, Rummy, etc.) have been moving towards this goal for decades.

Just finished a fine science fiction novel, John Scalzi's first, called "Old Man's War". He's a new writer, and also has a very fun to read blog.

Just about to start a new huge book on Caesar called "Caesar: Life of a Colossus". I took three years of Latin in high school so I've always been fasincated by Roman history.

North Country Dad 02-11-2007 04:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jackson's Dad (Post 64948)
I think the first thing that hits you, is that this war has been in the making for a long time. The key players (Cheney, Rummy, etc.) have been moving towards this goal for decades.

Old men with old ideas. I usually don't like this sentiment, because it's so misguided, but in this case, I would have loved to have forced Dick and Donald into fatigues and sent them overseas to fight their own damn war. W could go along, too, for comic relief.

Sorry...had to ramble there for a minute.

Thanks for insight on Fiasco. I have the same concerns -- that it's so depressing. Maybe I'll pick it up when the weather gets nicer? :shock:

silviomossa 02-11-2007 04:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jackson's Dad (Post 64948)
I started that book -- very well written, and so easy to read. But I had to stop after a chapter because it's so depressing. What a mess. I think the first thing that hits you, is that this war has been in the making for a long time. The key players (Cheney, Rummy, etc.) have been moving towards this goal for decades.

Despite that, I was a bit surprised to learn that the administration didn't plan on this from the outset, though some in the think-tanks on the outside did. It did take some persuasion, and a friend of Cheney noted that he was surprised when he did change course from containment to war.

What struck me (halfway through, up by Oct. 2003), as one who has read the news for years but not gone into all of the details of the war, is how the intelligence was sold, how there was really *no* post-war plan and why, specifically how many post-Saddam battles and situations were botched (and why), and how the lack of central authorities, as well as a clear sense of what the overall mission was/is, caused so many problems.

I never thought this war would work. Reading this, I see how *maybe* it could have worked if so many people hadn't screwed up. And all of that information makes it clear that the latest solutions, such as a troop surge, won't amount to a hill of beans.

silviomossa 02-11-2007 04:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by North Country Dad (Post 64952)
Thanks for insight on Fiasco. I have the same concerns -- that it's so depressing. Maybe I'll pick it up when the weather gets nicer? :shock:

I'm not depressed by it, though a bit outraged at times. It's a fascinating read and, as noted, well-written. I might be depressed by it if I found any of the conclusions surprising, but for the most part, I don't. It's many of the details that are all new to me.


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