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Old 01-18-2014, 11:55 PM
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Default Home Schooling?

So, my wife and I were discussing the possibility of home-schooling or doing a "classical" private education that is three days a week. What are the pros and cons? I'm not completely unintelligent and am willing to teach the kids. Can you deduct education expenses on income taxes, such as trips to DC or the space center?
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Old 01-19-2014, 03:42 AM
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Because of the enormous 1 on 1 time with the instructor and the ability to design a curriculum centered entirely around the student, home school and private tutored students consistently have better mastery over subject matter.

(Qualifier: must have a competent instructor.) I've known two students who were not taught in a pedagogical manner at home that could not function well in college when practical applications were necessary.

The cons are stereotypical, but real. The opportunity to operate in a world apart from mom and dad on a regular basis is invaluable and difficult to re-create without school. Interaction with people and family of different circumstance and values has been shown to increase empathy. And a list of other things that are mostly social and can be overcome with planning.

My wife would like me to home school our daughter, and I've told her that I don't want to unless there is some kind of issue with school when the time comes. My wife hated school and remembers it as a place ripe with mean people and bad influences. I enjoyed all of school. Most of my good memories, all of my friends, and my wife came from school. I owe most of what my life is and a good part of who I am to the social experiences and relationships that I had in school.

From what I have seen students tend to think of school in the way their parents do. I don't know my daughter as a school age child yet, and so I can't definitevly say what will be best for her. Only your kids parents can know if what they need. All we can do is support the learning of our public schooled kids and the social skills of our home schooled kids. Now that I have double talked over myself on every point, it's just a judgement call.
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Old 01-19-2014, 03:06 PM
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I would second most of what dl said above.
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Old 01-19-2014, 04:08 PM
silviomossa silviomossa is offline
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I've had students who were home schooled. Some were quite bright, others not. Like all else, the quality of the "school" matters. I couldn't do it myself because I don't think I would do a good job, but some do it quite well.

I will say that almost every at-home parent that I know has considered it, especially when the kids are 2-3 years old and they seem most vulnerable. Most don't do it and find that real schools work out just fine, but that depends a lot on one's options.
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Old 01-19-2014, 05:31 PM
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I was also wondering if anyone has taken the "classical" education approach. I remember discussing those options with someone several years back. They found a private school that was like a home school hybrid. The attended either MWF or TThS classes, and the parents filled-in in between with a structure or guide supplied by the school. Basically, a less expensive version of private school that taught the classical trivium (letters, logic, and rhetoric) with the addition of arithmetic. I do know from personal observation and experience that languages (music included) are best learned or at least started before the age of about 10.

I myself tested as part of an accelerated program when I was 11 (the last year that it was offered). Some private money funded a public school program that, in hindsight, was a classical initiative. It was for grades 3 through 6. I had heard that they began teaching the 3rd graders Latin. Us 6th graders went through several modules on art, architecture, genetics, law, original invention (like a science fair, but much more difficult), and future problem solving (we were divided into groups, given about 20 pages front and back of background data that looked like the CFR, given a problem, and had to find the best solution.

We attended this "school" outside of school for about 4 hours one day week, and it completely trumped anything else I did that year in school.

I just wonder if the kids have a Latin background, that they might be able to enter into engineering, medical, or legal professions with greater ease, if they want to.
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Old 01-22-2014, 03:53 AM
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I'd agree with dl too. Except for some damn word like pedogological that I had to look up.

As silvio said, I think it's hard not to consider it as an at home parent. I did. I also realized after having them home full time for years that I'd lose my mind if I didn't get a break sometimes. I consider myself to have home schooled AND public schooled. There's still a lot of time away from school, in addition to all that time before Kindergarten. I really like that he sees the real world and all it's imperfection at school, whether it's teachers, kids, what they study or something else. I don't want my kids to get too caught up in the more (including learning) is always better philosophy. I've still pushed them to do well, within reason hopefully.
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